Usually, when people think of RVs, the first thing that comes to mind are the typical campervans packed with small appliances and elevated roofs, or the spacious and luxurious Class A motorhomes that cruise America’s Interstate Highways. While these are amongst the most popular RV models, RVs come in many shapes and sizes, and some are even designed just to store belongings, with no sleeping quarters or mini fridges in sight. However, RVs oftentimes include amenities such as cooking equipment and storage space. They can be self-motorized or towed behind a vehicle.
Life insurance premiums depend on the age of the insured party. Because younger people are less likely to die than older people, younger people typically pay lower life insurance costs. Gender plays a similar role. Because women tend to live longer than men, women tend to pay lower premiums. Engaging in risky activities increases insurance costs. For example, a racecar driver faces an increased risk of death and, as a result, may pay high life insurance premiums or be denied coverage.

Collision insurance is a coverage that helps pay to repair or replace your car if it's damaged in an accident with another vehicle or object, such as a fence or a tree. If you're leasing or financing your car, collision coverage is typically required by the lender. If your car is paid off, collision is an optional coverage on your car insurance policy.
Good customer service is especially essential when you’re in a crisis after an accident or theft. Excellent insurance providers make it easy for you to file a claim online or over the phone. They also offer accessible service 24/7 through a customer helpline or roadside assistance. If a company’s a hassle to deal with when you truly need help, it may make an already difficult situation even more trying.
Whether you are a Millennial or a Baby Boomer, if you have never traversed the tricky field of buying insurance for an RV, your best option is most likely going to be a reliable marketplace that can both inform and point users in the right direction. RVInsurance.com is just that kind of marketplace, featuring a wealth of helpful information pertaining to purchasing an RV, insuring it, and staying safe on the road.

Basic coverage — which is required by law — offers you protection for personal injuries and damages to the vehicle, but it won’t cover extras like your belongings inside. If you live in your RV full-time, it might also be a good idea to invest in additional protection that covers your housing expenses or RV replacement costs. Before shopping around, draw up a list of necessary coverage options and make sure they’re offered by your prospective provider.
If you live in your RV full-time for more than six months of the year, Allstate will not be able to insure your RV. Because of that, Allstate is a more suitable provider for people who only use their RVs occasionally: Its policies include basic coverage, sound system coverage, personal belongings coverage, medical payment, roadside assistance, and rental reimbursement.
Lastly, National General has discounts that are aimed at attracting supporters and members of certain organizations. For example, active and retired General Motors employees, current employees of General Motors suppliers, such as Chevrolet, Hummer, and Pontiac, OnStar subscribers, and GM/GMAC customers are all eligible for discounts on their premiums.

Most of our top picks offer a slew of discounts, so be sure to check out each company’s available options. Typically, you’ll save money if you’re able to bundle your auto and RV insurance together. Some providers also offer discounts for having a membership to an RV club or completing RV training/safety courses. Additionally, many insurers consider you less of a risk if your RV is equipped with updated safety features like air bags, anti-lock brakes, and anti-theft devices. And remember: The fewer traffic violations you have, the lower your premium will be.
Bus-conversion homes are a popular and fast-growing trend within the RV lifestyle. City buses, Greyhounds, and even school buses are highly sought after and, once renovated, become non-traditional RVs that fall into the Class A category. While bus renovation projects are becoming mainstream, they can be difficult to insure. Buses, especially school bus-converted homes or “Skoolies,” are considered more of a risk due to their weight and balance limitations. Vehicles originally built for mass transportation do not have the same axle and weight distribution as traditional RVs, which are designed for sleeping and carrying additional living necessities.
If your car is worth more than $3,000 and/or is less than 10 years old, we'd also suggest both collision and comprehensive coverage, too. Our estimates suggest drivers can buy comprehensive and collision insurance for an average of $600 to $700 per year (however, the cost may be higher for some cars), so you would spend $3,000 to $3,500 in premiums over five years. If your car is currently worth less than $3,000, you will have spent more on insurance than your car is worth. You can obtain the estimated value of your car from sites like Kelley Blue Book and Edmunds. Once you have both the value and a quote for coverage, you can determine whether collision insurance will be worth it.
Full-time RVers can enjoy coverage similar to that of homeowners insurance through the Good Sam Insurance Agency’s specialized protection plan for full timers or first-time weekend RVers. Full-Time Insurance goes above and beyond what traditional Auto Insurance policies can protect because it covers a number of other incidents and situations that regular RV insurance does not.
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