So now that we understand the difference between auto and RV coverage, let’s take a look at the specifics of what you get under an RV policy. Essentially, RV insurance acts as a hybrid between car and home insurance, offering additional protection for home and living essentials through specialized coverage plans. Depending on the policy you choose, it may include:
Do you live in your RV full-time, or does it sit in storage for most of the year? Do you have any permanent attachments like a satellite dish? Every company offers basic RV coverage, but the right provider for you also offers the set of add-ons that speaks to your main concerns, whether it’s full-time residency insurance or roadside assistance. Our top picks all have plenty of add-ons in addition to basic coverage.
Progressive’s app has 3.4 stars in the Apple App Store and has the same functions as most other providers’ apps: You can report a claim, pay your bills, view your policy, get in touch with an agent, and request roadside assistance. However, out of over 600 current ratings, many users complain that the app is buggy and isn’t easy to use. If mobile access is important to you, Progressive may make a stressful process even more frustrating.
Bus-conversion homes are a popular and fast-growing trend within the RV lifestyle. City buses, Greyhounds, and even school buses are highly sought after and, once renovated, become non-traditional RVs that fall into the Class A category. While bus renovation projects are becoming mainstream, they can be difficult to insure. Buses, especially school bus-converted homes or “Skoolies,” are considered more of a risk due to their weight and balance limitations. Vehicles originally built for mass transportation do not have the same axle and weight distribution as traditional RVs, which are designed for sleeping and carrying additional living necessities.
RV insurance can be very different from car insurance depending on the type of RV or motorhome you have and how much you use it. Whether you have a camper trailer for weekend getaways and day trips; a large RV for extended vacations; or a motor home that you use as your primary residence, The Hartford has RV insurance solutions that you can customize to meet your needs.
Let's use the aftermath of a major storm to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two hypothetical events: First, a heavy telephone pole was blown down and fell on your truck, or second, you swerved to avoid a falling tree and wound up crashing into a guardrail. In the first event, you couldn't control when or why a tree fell on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the guardrail. This makes it a collision, and collision insurance pays for the damages.
Traditionally, motorhomes have been very popular among baby boomers who take advantage of their retirement to travel and vacation. The Recreation Vehicle Industry Association estimates that 750,000 to one million retirees consider an RV their home. For many of these older RVers, their love of the outdoors stems from childhood camping and family trips.  
In the states with no-fault insurance, insured drivers are typically paid for medical expenses by their own insurers, regardless of who caused the accident. Nonetheless, BI liability coverage is still required in no-fault states because if injuries are bad, the at-fault driver may be sued by the injured party. If that happens, your BI coverage can help cover your liability expenses.
Let's use the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy as an example to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two events that might have happened: 1) a heavy tree branch fell on your car, or 2) you swerved to avoid a falling tree branch and wound up crashing into a tree. In the first event, you had no control over when or why a tree branch would fall on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the tree, which makes it a collision, and collision insurance therefore pays for the damages. Events like the hypothetical ones stated above are why it's important to differentiate between the two types of coverage.

While not as highly rated in the Apple App Store as apps from Farmers and Allstate, users note that State Farm’s 4.2-star app doesn’t have significant issues with functionality. You’ll be able to view your policy, request roadside assistance, and file a claim. You won’t find more personalized features like Allstate’s QuickFoto capability, but this more basic functionality means that it offers a more straightforward experience for anyone who isn’t particularly mobile-inclined.
Most car insurance providers will offer to include your RV as part of your auto insurance policy, as such you will get traditional car insurance coverage. This will include bodily injury and property damage liability coverage, personal injury protection, collision, comprehensive, medical payments, and uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage, which essentially protects you against accidents and physical damage while on the road. (For a more detailed explanation of coverage see below.)  

Jonathan and Ashley Longnecker, full-time RVers and bloggers of TinyShinyHome.com, sold their new and oversized 5th-wheel trailer for a much smaller, compact vintage Airstream. Although a family of six, their original RV was very heavy, long, and tall, which made it more difficult to travel long distances without worrying about parking, turning, and hitting low overpasses. The family decided they’d sacrifice the extra space in order to travel lighter and with greater peace of mind. 
The main difference between collision and comprehensive coverage comes down to the question of what the driver controls. Collision insurance will cover events within a motorist's control or when another vehicle collides with your car. Comprehensive coverage generally falls under "acts of God or nature," or things that are typically out of your control when driving. These can include events such as a spooked deer, a heavy hailstorm, or a carjacking.
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We evaluated each company’s track record with its customers by looking at the available complaint data on online regulatory organizations' pages and by searching for company pages on independent consumer review websites such as the Better Business Bureau. Some companies also provide unfiltered reviews on their own websites, helping to give greater insight into customer satisfaction rates.
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