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Nationwide’s coverage options make it easy for part-time RV users with accessorized RVs to get the support they need. Besides basic coverage, Nationwide also insures personal belongings and sound systems. If you’ve tricked out your RV especially for vacation, Nationwide has you covered there, too: It provides roadside assistance, rental reimbursement, emergency expenses, and vacation liability for personal injuries.
Individual and family health insurance plans can help cover expenses in the case of serious medical emergencies, and help you and your family stay on top of preventative health-care services. Having health insurance coverage can save you money on doctor's visits, prescriptions drugs, preventative care and other health-care services. Typical health insurance plans for individuals include costs such as a monthly premium, annual deductible, copayments, and coinsurance.
Bus-home conversions are a rapidly-growing trend that several RV insurance companies are adapting into their policies. The type of bus, however, is a prominent deciding factor in coverage, since bus axles differ from traditional RVs and aren’t built to carry a certain amount of weight. Many RV insurance companies avoid school bus-converted homes, as they have a higher risk of rollover accidents. Also, your bus-converted home must be registered as a recreational vehicle for personal use to be eligible for RV-insurance. Depending on the state where you register your vehicle, it may require your bus to comply with several requirements and meet certain standards before registration. It’s important that you check with your local department of motor vehicles beforehand.
Jonathan and Ashley Longnecker, full-time RVers and bloggers of TinyShinyHome.com, sold their new and oversized 5th-wheel trailer for a much smaller, compact vintage Airstream. Although a family of six, their original RV was very heavy, long, and tall, which made it more difficult to travel long distances without worrying about parking, turning, and hitting low overpasses. The family decided they’d sacrifice the extra space in order to travel lighter and with greater peace of mind. 
Liability insurance usually includes bodily injury coverage and property damage coverage. Bodily injury coverage is designed to cover all of the other party’s medical expenses resulting from any injuries received in an accident for which you’re at fault, while property damage coverage helps cover the costs of any damage to another person’s property, such as vehicle repairs, replacements, or damaged structures resulting from said accident.

So now that we understand the difference between auto and RV coverage, let’s take a look at the specifics of what you get under an RV policy. Essentially, RV insurance acts as a hybrid between car and home insurance, offering additional protection for home and living essentials through specialized coverage plans. Depending on the policy you choose, it may include:
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Still, regardless of whether your state requires you to have an RV insurance policy, it’s always best to have one if you plan on living in your RV full-time to protect yourself and your vehicle against any damages and covered losses. On the other hand, if you plan on using your RV seasonally or for short trips, then liability coverage might be enough.
To ensure that providers’ financial affairs were up to snuff, we looked at independent evaluations from insurance rating and credit rating agencies A.M. Best, S&P Global, Moody’s, and J.D. Power. While each agency has its own rating scale, we required companies to have A or “above average” ratings from all four — solid indications that companies are in great financial health. Acquiring ratings from all four agencies also indicates that companies care enough about their business’ reputation to apply for these voluntary review processes. For an industry that’s centered around the principle of being there when you need help most, we found this focus on transparency to be the mark of a good provider. Smaller companies like Good Sam or National Interstate may provide seemingly better discounts, but they tend to only submit themselves for review to one or two agencies.
Further examples are the company’s storage option and low mileage discount—both great solutions for part-time RVers. Baby Boomers are more likely to own a home and those that were born between 1946 and 1964 are now heading into retirement. This makes them more prone to RV part-time rather than full-time when compared to Millennials, for example. Some Baby Boomers end up making their RVs a home-on-wheels, but many are also likely to take their RV out for vacation with their families, or to explore the great outdoors for certain seasons or periods of time.

While State Farm’s website recommends speaking with an agent to see what discounts are available to you for motorhome insurance, it doesn’t list any universal discounts. It’s still possible to save on your premiums, but there’s less transparency about what you may qualify for. If discounts are important to you, it’s best to get clarity from a State Farm agent on what to expect before signing up.

All of Progressive’s RV insurance policies come with standard coverage: comprehensive, collision, liability, uninsured/underinsured motorist, and medical payments. Consumers seeking extra coverage will see that Progressive provides a number of options at no additional cost, including pet injury, Mexico physical damage, and trailer coverage for motorhomes.

RV Insurance companies take these type of risk factors into account, which makes it more difficult for bus-conversion homeowners to find the best coverage. Also, buses first need to be registered as RVs with the department of motor vehicles beforehand. If not, they’re still considered commercial vehicles instead of personal, and will not qualify for RV insurance. Different states have different requirements as to what qualifies as an RV, many of which include repainting the bus a different color, having a potable water supply, installing a toilet, and having cooking appliances onboard.


National General’s list of discounts is varied enough to provide every type of customer with a chance to lower their premiums and/or deductibles, but Baby Boomers are particularly well positioned to capitalize on them. For example, the company allows customers to bundle RV and auto policies under its One Convenient Policy program. National General also offers homeowners discounts that are easy for them to qualify for, as Boomers are more affluent than other generations on average and thus more likely to own a house and additional vehicles.
The cost of insurance is on the rise: the price for auto insurance rose 3.6% between 2011 and 2012, and 3.1% for homeowners and renter’s insurance, according to the Insurance Information Institute. In fact, auto liability insurance premiums alone have been increasing by 2.8% annually for the past three years. This makes choosing the right coverage and provider all the more crucial to save money without sacrificing important aspects of coverage.
Many providers offer discounts as rewards for “good” customer behavior. Common ones include discounts for driving safely, paying your entire annual premium upfront, keeping your RV in storage for part of the year, switching from another provider, holding membership in an RV association, or taking an RV safety course. We noted if a provider listed generous discounts available to all customers. However, many discounts vary depending on location. To see if there are any specific to your area and to compare RV insurance prices, ask an agent.

While there are a couple of benefits of collision insurance, the main one is that you can file a claim and receive reimbursement regardless of who was at fault. Collision claims usually get processed faster than property damage claims because the insurance company does not have to spend time investigating who was at-fault. Another benefit is that you only deal with your own insurance company, rather than another insurer with less incentive to pay for your claim. Collision insurance can also be used toward your rental car in most cases, which can spare you from having to buy rental car insurance.
As with our other large insurance providers, Nationwide has a mobile app that allows you to file a claim, pay your bill, and view your insurance card. However, while it currently has a 4.2-star rating on the Apple App Store, its Google Play rating sits at a mediocre 3.5. Many users complain that several of the app’s features malfunction and need attention from developers. If you’re trying to file a claim after an accident, you don’t need the additional stress of a poorly functioning app, even if it’s free. While the app’s capabilities may improve over time, it’s best to stick with providers like Allstate if mobile app functionality is important to you.
If you live in your RV full-time for more than six months of the year, Allstate will not be able to insure your RV. Because of that, Allstate is a more suitable provider for people who only use their RVs occasionally: Its policies include basic coverage, sound system coverage, personal belongings coverage, medical payment, roadside assistance, and rental reimbursement.
Collision coverage has a deductible, which is the amount you pay before your coverage helps pay for your claim. You can typically choose the amount of your deductible when you buy coverage. So, if you choose a $1,000 deductible and your car is later damaged in a covered accident, you'd have to pay $1,000 toward repair costs. Your collision coverage would help pay the rest, up to your coverage limit.

By law, any type of registered vehicle must be insured. Motorhomes, like cars, are required to at least have liability insurance. Travel trailers and other towable RVs, on the other hand, cannot be driven and therefore aren’t required to have insurance. Keep in mind that towable RVs, although not vehicles, are still susceptible to theft, damage from natural disasters, vandalism, and collision, so it is highly recommended for them to still have coverage.

Three other ways to keep payments low further cement Progressive RV Insurance as our choice for Millennials. The first, small accident forgiveness, goes into effect as soon as a policy starts and excuses customers for claims of $500 or less. The second and third are particularly remarkable for the way they encourage long-standing relationships with customers.
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