A good number of quotes to compare is three. If you already know three companies whose RV insurance you are interested in, go through each of their quoting applications. Then, compare the final estimated premiums and the features of its policy: maybe company A’s policy is cheaper overall, but company B’s offers greater coverage for a slightly more expensive price.

An insurance provider and you might not consider your RV to be worth the same. By settling on an agreed value with your potential RV insurance provider, you are ensuring that both you and your insurance company have the same value of your RV in mind if you face a worst-case scenario—the total loss of your RV. It’s also important to ask about the next lower threshold for an agreed value premium. By agreeing to a slightly lower level of coverage, you might be able to save plenty on your premiums.


If you’re drawn to the minimalist and tiny home movement, or simply enjoy traveling for a living, you’re probably interested in buying an RV. Travel trailers are still the most popular and common RVs, with many families opting for the larger, bus-sized motorhomes. Whichever you decide, it’s beneficial to analyze your family’s individual needs and weigh the pros and cons. 
Both part-timers and full-timers can find coverage geared towards their type of RVing. Part-timers can opt for Progressive’s vacation liability coverage, which offers up to $10,000, with an upgrade of up to $500,000 if someone is hurt in or around their RV while they are on vacation, and emergency expense coverage, which provides $750 for transportation and hotel costs plus meals, again, if they are on vacation. Full-timers can enhance their coverage with Progressive’s full timer’s personal liability, replacement cost of personal effects, and total loss coverages.
Still, regardless of whether your state requires you to have an RV insurance policy, it’s always best to have one if you plan on living in your RV full-time to protect yourself and your vehicle against any damages and covered losses. On the other hand, if you plan on using your RV seasonally or for short trips, then liability coverage might be enough.
While not all large insurance companies are the same, some of them might be selling insurance policies for vehicles that they do not have much experience covering. RV insurance in particular is offered by many auto insurance companies who may not be well prepared for handling the intricacies of an RV insurance claim. When choosing who is going to insure your vehicle, make sure it is a provider who specializes in RV insurance—regardless of its size—or that at least has a good track record of dealing with RV insurance policies and claims.
RVInsurance.com is partnered with twenty carriers known in the industry for their strong and consistent financial performance. Nationwide, the Foremost Insurance Group, National General, and Safeco Insurance are some of these carriers, to name a few. They share similar A-or-higher ratings with at least one of the large financial strength rating agencies.

Financial experts often say it’s smart to drop collision when you drive an old car, then put your car insurance savings in a fund earmarked for emergency repairs or buying a new car. However, when you’re trying to decide when to drop collision coverage, the answer really comes down to your personal finances. “If you’re not absolutely sure that you could deal with paying for repairs or completely replacing your vehicle at a moment’s notice, or else going without a vehicle until you could save for a replacement, it’s best to err on the side of caution and pay the extra premium for collision coverage,” The Simple Dollar advises.


Liability insurance usually includes bodily injury coverage and property damage coverage. Bodily injury coverage is designed to cover all of the other party’s medical expenses resulting from any injuries received in an accident for which you’re at fault, while property damage coverage helps cover the costs of any damage to another person’s property, such as vehicle repairs, replacements, or damaged structures resulting from said accident.
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For our top picks, we preferred online claim reporting capabilities (including mobile app options) for customer convenience, but we also wanted companies to offer easy access to real human support. Whether you want to have another person on the line throughout the whole process or prefer to keep things digital, a good insurance company offers you plenty of options for claims.
Lastly, National General has discounts that are aimed at attracting supporters and members of certain organizations. For example, active and retired General Motors employees, current employees of General Motors suppliers, such as Chevrolet, Hummer, and Pontiac, OnStar subscribers, and GM/GMAC customers are all eligible for discounts on their premiums.
When judging coverage and benefits, we singled out RV insurance carriers that offered extensive and flexible coverage options. To be considered for our list, companies had to provide all the traditional insurance protection, as well as a healthy amount of RV-specific options. Most RV insurers offer liability, personal injury protection (PIP), collision, underinsured or uninsured motorist, and comprehensive coverage. Other types, such as full-timer and Mexico coverage, vary in availability from company to company.
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