It’s more than a car and it’s not quite a house, which is why it can be so challenging to find the right coverage for your home on wheels at an affordable rate. So, whether you need RV insurance, motorhome insurance or trailer insurance, the AARP® Auto and Homeowners Insurance Program1 from The Hartford offers specialized protection for your home-sweet-home away from home.
Full-time RVers can enjoy coverage similar to that of homeowners insurance through the Good Sam Insurance Agency’s specialized protection plan for full timers or first-time weekend RVers. Full-Time Insurance goes above and beyond what traditional Auto Insurance policies can protect because it covers a number of other incidents and situations that regular RV insurance does not.
Full-time RVers can enjoy coverage similar to that of homeowners insurance through the Good Sam Insurance Agency’s specialized protection plan for full timers or first-time weekend RVers. Full-Time Insurance goes above and beyond what traditional Auto Insurance policies can protect because it covers a number of other incidents and situations that regular RV insurance does not.

Because her car’s so old, her savings are less: $168 to $204 in a year. But in this case, it could be wise for the driver to drop collision. If she were at fault in an accident, collision coverage would pay for repairs only up to the value of the car minus the deductible, or about $1,750. Is it worth repairing a car that wasn’t in great shape to begin with?


The coverage options that Good Sam’s Full Time RV Insurance provides include but are not limited to: personal liability, which is similar to vacation liability and pays for injuries that happen around the RV or on the customer’s property; medical payments to others, which covers the costs of medical expenses incurred by those who are injured while visiting the RV and/or the property around it; personal belongings coverage, which provides up to $3,000 of full replacement cost coverage at no extra cost; and an emergency expense allowance, which covers the costs of food and lodging if the customer is ever involved in a covered claim more than 100 miles from their home.
However, there are some circumstances where RV insurance is always required, even if it’s a towable model. For example, if you’re renting or financing your RV, both renters and lenders will want to make sure that they’ll be properly reimbursed in case of an accident or loss, and will require you to acquire an insurance policy before allowing you to take them on the road.
While not all large insurance companies are the same, some of them might be selling insurance policies for vehicles that they do not have much experience covering. RV insurance in particular is offered by many auto insurance companies who may not be well prepared for handling the intricacies of an RV insurance claim. When choosing who is going to insure your vehicle, make sure it is a provider who specializes in RV insurance—regardless of its size—or that at least has a good track record of dealing with RV insurance policies and claims.
One of Progressive’s add-on coverages includes a “disappearing deductible” option. This means that each year you don’t file a claim, Progressive will drop your rate by 25%. With this method, the company boasts that you could eventually have a $0 deductible. But it only stays this way as long as you haven’t filed a claim — if you do, your deductible will go right back up. Safeco also incentivizes safe driving with low deductibles. Safeco will reduce your collision deductible by $100 each year you don’t have a claim, but this incentive caps at $500.
Nationwide’s coverage options make it easy for part-time RV users with accessorized RVs to get the support they need. Besides basic coverage, Nationwide also insures personal belongings and sound systems. If you’ve tricked out your RV especially for vacation, Nationwide has you covered there, too: It provides roadside assistance, rental reimbursement, emergency expenses, and vacation liability for personal injuries.
Collision insurance is a coverage that helps pay to repair or replace your car if it's damaged in an accident with another vehicle or object, such as a fence or a tree. If you're leasing or financing your car, collision coverage is typically required by the lender. If your car is paid off, collision is an optional coverage on your car insurance policy.
Let's use the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy as an example to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two events that might have happened: 1) a heavy tree branch fell on your car, or 2) you swerved to avoid a falling tree branch and wound up crashing into a tree. In the first event, you had no control over when or why a tree branch would fall on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the tree, which makes it a collision, and collision insurance therefore pays for the damages. Events like the hypothetical ones stated above are why it's important to differentiate between the two types of coverage.
Companies also needed to offer full-timer coverage for those who live year-round in their RV; full replacement coverage in the event the RV is totaled or stolen; personal belonging coverage for the property inside the RV, including electronics, appliances, and jewelry; vacation liability coverage for injuries that occur at the vacation site where the RV is parked; and permanently attached items coverage for items like satellite dishes, wheelchair lifts, or retractable canopies. Finally, companies also were required to cover most, if not all types of recreational vehicles.
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