RV insurance isn’t the same thing as auto insurance, though many providers give you the option to bundle the two. But RVs have specialized concerns. To start, they can carry many more people than cars, and they cost more to repair. In addition to basic coverage, RV insurance can also offer more extensive protection, with coverage for personal belongings, emergency expenses for lodging, and higher damage rates.
The key difference in collision vs. comprehensive coverage is that, to a certain extent, the element of the car driver's control. As we have stated before, collision insurance will typically cover events within a motorist's control, or when another vehicle collides with your car. Comprehensive coverage generally falls under "acts of God or nature," that are typically out of your control when driving. These can include such events as a spooked deer, a heavy hailstorm, or a carjacking.
In the states with no-fault insurance, insured drivers are typically paid for medical expenses by their own insurers, regardless of who caused the accident. Nonetheless, BI liability coverage is still required in no-fault states because if injuries are bad, the at-fault driver may be sued by the injured party. If that happens, your BI coverage can help cover your liability expenses.

Regardless of how often you use your RV, Safeco is worth a look. Safeco offers coverage for anyone who lives in an RV fewer than 250 days (about eight months). While this won’t cover policyholders who live in their RV full-time, it serves as a nice middle-ground for people who only plan to store their RV away during the winter months, for instance.
Basic coverage — which is required by law — offers you protection for personal injuries and damages to the vehicle, but it won’t cover extras like your belongings inside. If you live in your RV full-time, it might also be a good idea to invest in additional protection that covers your housing expenses or RV replacement costs. Before shopping around, draw up a list of necessary coverage options and make sure they’re offered by your prospective provider.

Usually, when people think of RVs, the first thing that comes to mind are the typical campervans packed with small appliances and elevated roofs, or the spacious and luxurious Class A motorhomes that cruise America’s Interstate Highways. While these are amongst the most popular RV models, RVs come in many shapes and sizes, and some are even designed just to store belongings, with no sleeping quarters or mini fridges in sight. However, RVs oftentimes include amenities such as cooking equipment and storage space. They can be self-motorized or towed behind a vehicle.


The best RV insurance is affordable, comprehensive, and flexible according to your needs. Because your RV functions as both a home and a car, insurance policies resemble a combination of home and auto insurance — and consequently, they tend to be somewhat more complex and expensive. Policy price will vary depending on your location, class of RV, age and condition of the vehicle, frequency of use, and more. We dig into the pros and cons of several stellar providers below, although RV insurance prices vary based on specific location and situations. We recommend getting quotes from multiple companies to see which offers you the best quote.


Nationwide offers more discounts than most other providers, and you’ll likely be eligible for at least one. Discounts are offered for switching from another provider, paying your annual premium upfront, driving safely, not filing any claims in the previous insurance period, and having membership in Nationwide’s Affinity Group. Nationwide is also one of the only providers that will reward you for enrolling in an RV safety course.
Coverage for a wide variety of RV types may be obtained through RVInsurance.com. Class A, B, and C Motorhomes, Fifth-Wheel and Conventional Travel Trailers, Airstream Trailers, Trucks Campers, Bus Conversions, Toy Haulers, Horse Trailers, Pop-up Tent Trailers, and other specialty and custom RVs can all be covered by the company’s insurance options. The experts at RVInsurance.com are able to find insurance coverage for any kind of RV or motorhome clients might drive.

Let's use the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy as an example to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two events that might have happened: 1) a heavy tree branch fell on your car, or 2) you swerved to avoid a falling tree branch and wound up crashing into a tree. In the first event, you had no control over when or why a tree branch would fall on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the tree, which makes it a collision, and collision insurance therefore pays for the damages. Events like the hypothetical ones stated above are why it's important to differentiate between the two types of coverage.
Most car insurance providers will offer to include your RV as part of your auto insurance policy, as such you will get traditional car insurance coverage. This will include bodily injury and property damage liability coverage, personal injury protection, collision, comprehensive, medical payments, and uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage, which essentially protects you against accidents and physical damage while on the road. (For a more detailed explanation of coverage see below.)  
Good Sam shows an outstanding number of positive reviews on Birdeye, a platform which the company uses in order to get first-hand customer feedback that is both relevant and reliable. On the platform, customer satisfaction relating to its products and services hovers at around 96%. The company is also accredited with the Better Business Bureau, where it currently holds an excellent A+ rating.
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