The amount of insurance your RV requires will mainly depend on the type of motorhome or towable you own, how often you use it, and whether you plan to reside in it for six or more months out of the year. There are two types of recreational vehicles, the towable trailer and the motorhome, which falls into three categories: Class A, B or C motorhomes. Class A motorhomes are the largest and tend to be the most expensive. They often include luxury features, customized amenities, and permanent attachments that may require additional protection. Class B vehicles are the smallest type of RV, also known as “camper vans,” and are generally much cheaper to insure than larger motorhomes. Class C vehicles are a hybrid of Class A and B.

Nationwide’s coverage options make it easy for part-time RV users with accessorized RVs to get the support they need. Besides basic coverage, Nationwide also insures personal belongings and sound systems. If you’ve tricked out your RV especially for vacation, Nationwide has you covered there, too: It provides roadside assistance, rental reimbursement, emergency expenses, and vacation liability for personal injuries.

Traditionally, motorhomes have been very popular among baby boomers who take advantage of their retirement to travel and vacation. The Recreation Vehicle Industry Association estimates that 750,000 to one million retirees consider an RV their home. For many of these older RVers, their love of the outdoors stems from childhood camping and family trips.  
Full-time RVers can enjoy coverage similar to that of homeowners insurance through the Good Sam Insurance Agency’s specialized protection plan for full timers or first-time weekend RVers. Full-Time Insurance goes above and beyond what traditional Auto Insurance policies can protect because it covers a number of other incidents and situations that regular RV insurance does not.
If you’re drawn to the minimalist and tiny home movement, or simply enjoy traveling for a living, you’re probably interested in buying an RV. Travel trailers are still the most popular and common RVs, with many families opting for the larger, bus-sized motorhomes. Whichever you decide, it’s beneficial to analyze your family’s individual needs and weigh the pros and cons. 
Products underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies. Not all Nationwide affiliated companies are mutual companies, and not all Nationwide members are insured by a mutual company. Subject to underwriting guidelines, review and approval. Products and discounts not available to all persons in all states. Nationwide Investment Services Corporation, member FINRA. Home Office: One Nationwide Plaza, Columbus, OH. Nationwide, the Nationwide N and Eagle and other marks displayed on this page are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company, unless otherwise disclosed. ©2019. Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company.
RV Insurance companies take these type of risk factors into account, which makes it more difficult for bus-conversion homeowners to find the best coverage. Also, buses first need to be registered as RVs with the department of motor vehicles beforehand. If not, they’re still considered commercial vehicles instead of personal, and will not qualify for RV insurance. Different states have different requirements as to what qualifies as an RV, many of which include repainting the bus a different color, having a potable water supply, installing a toilet, and having cooking appliances onboard.
Good customer service is especially essential when you’re in a crisis after an accident or theft. Excellent insurance providers make it easy for you to file a claim online or over the phone. They also offer accessible service 24/7 through a customer helpline or roadside assistance. If a company’s a hassle to deal with when you truly need help, it may make an already difficult situation even more trying.
Bus-home conversions are a rapidly-growing trend that several RV insurance companies are adapting into their policies. The type of bus, however, is a prominent deciding factor in coverage, since bus axles differ from traditional RVs and aren’t built to carry a certain amount of weight. Many RV insurance companies avoid school bus-converted homes, as they have a higher risk of rollover accidents. Also, your bus-converted home must be registered as a recreational vehicle for personal use to be eligible for RV-insurance. Depending on the state where you register your vehicle, it may require your bus to comply with several requirements and meet certain standards before registration. It’s important that you check with your local department of motor vehicles beforehand.
Insurers don't determine your actual cash value (ACV) settlement based on what you owe, but rather on what the car is worth just prior to the accident. Let's say you owe $20,000 on your new car, but it's only worth about $16,000. If your car is totaled, you might get a settlement check of $16,000 but still owe an additional $4,000 on your loan or lease.
Companies also needed to offer full-timer coverage for those who live year-round in their RV; full replacement coverage in the event the RV is totaled or stolen; personal belonging coverage for the property inside the RV, including electronics, appliances, and jewelry; vacation liability coverage for injuries that occur at the vacation site where the RV is parked; and permanently attached items coverage for items like satellite dishes, wheelchair lifts, or retractable canopies. Finally, companies also were required to cover most, if not all types of recreational vehicles.
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