The main difference between collision and comprehensive coverage comes down to the question of what the driver controls. Collision insurance will cover events within a motorist's control or when another vehicle collides with your car. Comprehensive coverage generally falls under "acts of God or nature," or things that are typically out of your control when driving. These can include events such as a spooked deer, a heavy hailstorm, or a carjacking.
However, there are some circumstances where RV insurance is always required, even if it’s a towable model. For example, if you’re renting or financing your RV, both renters and lenders will want to make sure that they’ll be properly reimbursed in case of an accident or loss, and will require you to acquire an insurance policy before allowing you to take them on the road.

Please note that this website provides only a summary of auto insurance, written to illustrate in general terms how auto insurance works. Your insurance policy is the legal contract that contains the terms and limitations of your coverage. You should carefully review the contents of your policy. All products and coverages are subject to availability and limitations. Whether an accident or other loss is covered is subject to the terms and conditions of your insurance policy.


This wrebsite provides general information for educational purposes only and is not intended to be legal advice. We make no guarantees as to the validity of the information presented. Your particular facts and circumstances, and changes in the law, must be considered when applying insurance law. You should always consult with a competent auto insurance professional licensed in your state with respect to your particular situation.
Let's use the aftermath of a major storm to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two hypothetical events: First, a heavy telephone pole was blown down and fell on your truck, or second, you swerved to avoid a falling tree and wound up crashing into a guardrail. In the first event, you couldn't control when or why a tree fell on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the guardrail. This makes it a collision, and collision insurance pays for the damages.
All of Progressive’s RV insurance policies come with standard coverage: comprehensive, collision, liability, uninsured/underinsured motorist, and medical payments. Consumers seeking extra coverage will see that Progressive provides a number of options at no additional cost, including pet injury, Mexico physical damage, and trailer coverage for motorhomes.
Good customer service is especially essential when you’re in a crisis after an accident or theft. Excellent insurance providers make it easy for you to file a claim online or over the phone. They also offer accessible service 24/7 through a customer helpline or roadside assistance. If a company’s a hassle to deal with when you truly need help, it may make an already difficult situation even more trying.
Do you live in your RV full-time, or does it sit in storage for most of the year? Do you have any permanent attachments like a satellite dish? Every company offers basic RV coverage, but the right provider for you also offers the set of add-ons that speaks to your main concerns, whether it’s full-time residency insurance or roadside assistance. Our top picks all have plenty of add-ons in addition to basic coverage.

Though they may flirt with a higher overall number of brands, Millennials are intensely loyal to the few brands they do value. Large accident forgiveness and disappearing deductibles are two of Progressive’s benefits that reward this kind of long-term commitment. With the former, customers have a chance to avoid their rate going up for being in any sort of accident; with the latter, they can reduce their deductibles all the way down to $0 with each claim-free period on their policy.
Location-specific discounts are different for every company, but most will list at least one or two universal discounts that apply regardless of location. Farmers doesn’t list any of these; this means that you may or may not qualify for discounts, depending on your location. To find out if you’re eligible for any, contact a Farmers agent in your area.
Admittedly, we originally approached this topic with the traditional opinion that RVs were mainly of interest to retirees, the baby boomers who enjoy spending their post-work life experiencing the great outdoors. While this segment of the population has long been the backbone of the RV industry, the new trend of working remotely while traveling is attracting much younger consumers to the RV lifestyle.
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