RV insurance isn’t the same thing as auto insurance, though many providers give you the option to bundle the two. But RVs have specialized concerns. To start, they can carry many more people than cars, and they cost more to repair. In addition to basic coverage, RV insurance can also offer more extensive protection, with coverage for personal belongings, emergency expenses for lodging, and higher damage rates.
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Whether you are a Millennial or a Baby Boomer, if you have never traversed the tricky field of buying insurance for an RV, your best option is most likely going to be a reliable marketplace that can both inform and point users in the right direction. RVInsurance.com is just that kind of marketplace, featuring a wealth of helpful information pertaining to purchasing an RV, insuring it, and staying safe on the road.

Further examples are the company’s storage option and low mileage discount—both great solutions for part-time RVers. Baby Boomers are more likely to own a home and those that were born between 1946 and 1964 are now heading into retirement. This makes them more prone to RV part-time rather than full-time when compared to Millennials, for example. Some Baby Boomers end up making their RVs a home-on-wheels, but many are also likely to take their RV out for vacation with their families, or to explore the great outdoors for certain seasons or periods of time.
Let's use the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy as an example to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two events that might have happened: 1) a heavy tree branch fell on your car, or 2) you swerved to avoid a falling tree branch and wound up crashing into a tree. In the first event, you had no control over when or why a tree branch would fall on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the tree, which makes it a collision, and collision insurance therefore pays for the damages. Events like the hypothetical ones stated above are why it's important to differentiate between the two types of coverage.
Bus-conversion homes are a popular and fast-growing trend within the RV lifestyle. City buses, Greyhounds, and even school buses are highly sought after and, once renovated, become non-traditional RVs that fall into the Class A category. While bus renovation projects are becoming mainstream, they can be difficult to insure. Buses, especially school bus-converted homes or “Skoolies,” are considered more of a risk due to their weight and balance limitations. Vehicles originally built for mass transportation do not have the same axle and weight distribution as traditional RVs, which are designed for sleeping and carrying additional living necessities.
Though they may flirt with a higher overall number of brands, Millennials are intensely loyal to the few brands they do value. Large accident forgiveness and disappearing deductibles are two of Progressive’s benefits that reward this kind of long-term commitment. With the former, customers have a chance to avoid their rate going up for being in any sort of accident; with the latter, they can reduce their deductibles all the way down to $0 with each claim-free period on their policy.
Regardless of how often you use your RV, Safeco is worth a look. Safeco offers coverage for anyone who lives in an RV fewer than 250 days (about eight months). While this won’t cover policyholders who live in their RV full-time, it serves as a nice middle-ground for people who only plan to store their RV away during the winter months, for instance.
The minimum liability requirements vary from state to state, with most requiring only $50,000 in bodily injury coverage and $25,000 in property damage. However, to make sure you’re fully covered in case of an accident, we recommend policies that provide much more than the minimum. With this in mind, providers that featured a greater selection of coverage options with higher liability limits across the board ranked higher with us.
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