Choosing the lowest price/inadequate coverage. The lowest prices will typically leave you vulnerable on the back end; should an accident or collision occur, your lower premium will require you to spend much more out of pocket. The same goes for inadequate coverage. Specifically, don’t cut corners when it comes to liability coverage; instead, shop around for the provider that will protect you most while also catering to your needs, lifestyle, and budget.
Regardless of how often you use your RV, Safeco is worth a look. Safeco offers coverage for anyone who lives in an RV fewer than 250 days (about eight months). While this won’t cover policyholders who live in their RV full-time, it serves as a nice middle-ground for people who only plan to store their RV away during the winter months, for instance.
RVInsurance.com is partnered with twenty carriers known in the industry for their strong and consistent financial performance. Nationwide, the Foremost Insurance Group, National General, and Safeco Insurance are some of these carriers, to name a few. They share similar A-or-higher ratings with at least one of the large financial strength rating agencies.

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The coverage options that Good Sam’s Full Time RV Insurance provides include but are not limited to: personal liability, which is similar to vacation liability and pays for injuries that happen around the RV or on the customer’s property; medical payments to others, which covers the costs of medical expenses incurred by those who are injured while visiting the RV and/or the property around it; personal belongings coverage, which provides up to $3,000 of full replacement cost coverage at no extra cost; and an emergency expense allowance, which covers the costs of food and lodging if the customer is ever involved in a covered claim more than 100 miles from their home.
There is a case to be made for getting just comprehensive and not collision insurance, even if your car is not valuable. Comprehensive covers you for a lot more perils than does collision--including, most importantly, against theft. Regardless of the value of your car, having it stolen is a major inconvenience. Even if your car is worth only $2,000 at the time of the theft, and your insurer gives you $1,500, that sum would go a long way in buying yourself a new vehicle. As we discuss in more detail below, comprehensive insurance generally costs no more than $200 per year, so a $1,500 reimbursement would make the coverage valuable.
When judging coverage and benefits, we singled out RV insurance carriers that offered extensive and flexible coverage options. To be considered for our list, companies had to provide all the traditional insurance protection, as well as a healthy amount of RV-specific options. Most RV insurers offer liability, personal injury protection (PIP), collision, underinsured or uninsured motorist, and comprehensive coverage. Other types, such as full-timer and Mexico coverage, vary in availability from company to company.
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