According to Greg Gerber, “Most car insurance firms don’t have a clue of what can go wrong with an RV and don’t provide the coverage to get it fixed adequately,” which is why he advises consumers to get a separate policy for their RVs instead of bundling, to “avoid the hassle that can come if the RV itself is broken and they’re trying to get their car insurance company to fix it.” 
Admittedly, we originally approached this topic with the traditional opinion that RVs were mainly of interest to retirees, the baby boomers who enjoy spending their post-work life experiencing the great outdoors. While this segment of the population has long been the backbone of the RV industry, the new trend of working remotely while traveling is attracting much younger consumers to the RV lifestyle.
Nationwide car insurance can cover you for accidents involving other vehicles, vandalism, weather, animals, bodily injuries and more. As a Nationwide member, you can select the coverage you get because our policies are customizable – you can choose the auto insurance policies that suit your lifestyle. You can have peace of mind knowing Nationwide will provide you and your car with great protection on the road. 
The amount of insurance your RV requires will mainly depend on the type of motorhome or towable you own, how often you use it, and whether you plan to reside in it for six or more months out of the year. There are two types of recreational vehicles, the towable trailer and the motorhome, which falls into three categories: Class A, B or C motorhomes. Class A motorhomes are the largest and tend to be the most expensive. They often include luxury features, customized amenities, and permanent attachments that may require additional protection. Class B vehicles are the smallest type of RV, also known as “camper vans,” and are generally much cheaper to insure than larger motorhomes. Class C vehicles are a hybrid of Class A and B.
All of the company’s agents are provided with ongoing education and training in order to stay up to date with the latest developments in the RV insurance industry. The volume of positive feedback on the Better Business Bureau and other third-party review aggregators attests to the satisfaction that most clients have with the company's service. Many clients express contentment with the company's quick and attentive customer service, in particular.
Progressive Home Advantage® policies are placed through Progressive Advantage Agency, Inc. with affiliated and third-party insurers who are solely responsible for claims, and pay PAA commission for policies sold. Prices, coverages, privacy policies, and PAA's commission vary among these insurers. How you buy (phone, online, mobile, or independent agent/broker) determines which insurers are available to you. Click here for a list of the insurers or contact us for more information about PAA's commission. Discounts not available in all states and situations.

As with our other large insurance providers, Nationwide has a mobile app that allows you to file a claim, pay your bill, and view your insurance card. However, while it currently has a 4.2-star rating on the Apple App Store, its Google Play rating sits at a mediocre 3.5. Many users complain that several of the app’s features malfunction and need attention from developers. If you’re trying to file a claim after an accident, you don’t need the additional stress of a poorly functioning app, even if it’s free. While the app’s capabilities may improve over time, it’s best to stick with providers like Allstate if mobile app functionality is important to you.
Full-time RVers can enjoy coverage similar to that of homeowners insurance through the Good Sam Insurance Agency’s specialized protection plan for full timers or first-time weekend RVers. Full-Time Insurance goes above and beyond what traditional Auto Insurance policies can protect because it covers a number of other incidents and situations that regular RV insurance does not.
While not all large insurance companies are the same, some of them might be selling insurance policies for vehicles that they do not have much experience covering. RV insurance in particular is offered by many auto insurance companies who may not be well prepared for handling the intricacies of an RV insurance claim. When choosing who is going to insure your vehicle, make sure it is a provider who specializes in RV insurance—regardless of its size—or that at least has a good track record of dealing with RV insurance policies and claims.
Jonathan and Ashley Longnecker, full-time RVers and bloggers of TinyShinyHome.com, sold their new and oversized 5th-wheel trailer for a much smaller, compact vintage Airstream. Although a family of six, their original RV was very heavy, long, and tall, which made it more difficult to travel long distances without worrying about parking, turning, and hitting low overpasses. The family decided they’d sacrifice the extra space in order to travel lighter and with greater peace of mind. 
For this review, we focused on national providers and left out any companies that only insure RVs locally. Odds are, national insurers are able to provide coverage no matter where you are in the U.S., and they are more likely to have the financial strength to support you. If you’re trusting a provider to come through when you’re most in need, it’s reassuring to have a company with years of experience and a history of financial success at your back.

Collision insurance is a coverage that helps pay to repair or replace your car if it's damaged in an accident with another vehicle or object, such as a fence or a tree. If you're leasing or financing your car, collision coverage is typically required by the lender. If your car is paid off, collision is an optional coverage on your car insurance policy.

If your car is worth more than $3,000 and/or is less than 10 years old, we'd also suggest both collision and comprehensive coverage, too. Our estimates suggest drivers can buy comprehensive and collision insurance for an average of $600 to $700 per year (however, the cost may be higher for some cars), so you would spend $3,000 to $3,500 in premiums over five years. If your car is currently worth less than $3,000, you will have spent more on insurance than your car is worth. You can obtain the estimated value of your car from sites like Kelley Blue Book and Edmunds. Once you have both the value and a quote for coverage, you can determine whether collision insurance will be worth it.
The minimum liability requirements vary from state to state, with most requiring only $50,000 in bodily injury coverage and $25,000 in property damage. However, to make sure you’re fully covered in case of an accident, we recommend policies that provide much more than the minimum. With this in mind, providers that featured a greater selection of coverage options with higher liability limits across the board ranked higher with us.
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