RV insurance can be very different from car insurance depending on the type of RV or motorhome you have and how much you use it. Whether you have a camper trailer for weekend getaways and day trips; a large RV for extended vacations; or a motor home that you use as your primary residence, The Hartford has RV insurance solutions that you can customize to meet your needs.
This wrebsite provides general information for educational purposes only and is not intended to be legal advice. We make no guarantees as to the validity of the information presented. Your particular facts and circumstances, and changes in the law, must be considered when applying insurance law. You should always consult with a competent auto insurance professional licensed in your state with respect to your particular situation.
Further examples are the company’s storage option and low mileage discount—both great solutions for part-time RVers. Baby Boomers are more likely to own a home and those that were born between 1946 and 1964 are now heading into retirement. This makes them more prone to RV part-time rather than full-time when compared to Millennials, for example. Some Baby Boomers end up making their RVs a home-on-wheels, but many are also likely to take their RV out for vacation with their families, or to explore the great outdoors for certain seasons or periods of time.
It’s more than a car and it’s not quite a house, which is why it can be so challenging to find the right coverage for your home on wheels at an affordable rate. So, whether you need RV insurance, motorhome insurance or trailer insurance, the AARP® Auto and Homeowners Insurance Program1 from The Hartford offers specialized protection for your home-sweet-home away from home.
Insurers don't determine your actual cash value (ACV) settlement based on what you owe, but rather on what the car is worth just prior to the accident. Let's say you owe $20,000 on your new car, but it's only worth about $16,000. If your car is totaled, you might get a settlement check of $16,000 but still owe an additional $4,000 on your loan or lease.

Further examples are the company’s storage option and low mileage discount—both great solutions for part-time RVers. Baby Boomers are more likely to own a home and those that were born between 1946 and 1964 are now heading into retirement. This makes them more prone to RV part-time rather than full-time when compared to Millennials, for example. Some Baby Boomers end up making their RVs a home-on-wheels, but many are also likely to take their RV out for vacation with their families, or to explore the great outdoors for certain seasons or periods of time.
Insurers don't determine your actual cash value (ACV) settlement based on what you owe, but rather on what the car is worth just prior to the accident. Let's say you owe $20,000 on your new car, but it's only worth about $16,000. If your car is totaled, you might get a settlement check of $16,000 but still owe an additional $4,000 on your loan or lease.
Nationwide’s coverage options make it easy for part-time RV users with accessorized RVs to get the support they need. Besides basic coverage, Nationwide also insures personal belongings and sound systems. If you’ve tricked out your RV especially for vacation, Nationwide has you covered there, too: It provides roadside assistance, rental reimbursement, emergency expenses, and vacation liability for personal injuries.
Financial experts often say it’s smart to drop collision when you drive an old car, then put your car insurance savings in a fund earmarked for emergency repairs or buying a new car. However, when you’re trying to decide when to drop collision coverage, the answer really comes down to your personal finances. “If you’re not absolutely sure that you could deal with paying for repairs or completely replacing your vehicle at a moment’s notice, or else going without a vehicle until you could save for a replacement, it’s best to err on the side of caution and pay the extra premium for collision coverage,” The Simple Dollar advises.
The minimum liability requirements vary from state to state, with most requiring only $50,000 in bodily injury coverage and $25,000 in property damage. However, to make sure you’re fully covered in case of an accident, we recommend policies that provide much more than the minimum. With this in mind, providers that featured a greater selection of coverage options with higher liability limits across the board ranked higher with us.
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