Tech-savvy consumers have probably heard of or have been inspired by the “digital nomad” lifestyle, where people have been ditching their office cubicles to work remotely. Social media strategists, photographers, and web designers can all work from the comfort of home, as long as there’s a stable internet connection. Hit TV shows such as HGTV’s Tiny House Hunters and Travel Channel’s Going RV are shining a light on younger couples and families that save money by downsizing to a motorhome for a non-traditional life on the road.

Still, regardless of whether your state requires you to have an RV insurance policy, it’s always best to have one if you plan on living in your RV full-time to protect yourself and your vehicle against any damages and covered losses. On the other hand, if you plan on using your RV seasonally or for short trips, then liability coverage might be enough.


Location-specific discounts are different for every company, but most will list at least one or two universal discounts that apply regardless of location. Farmers doesn’t list any of these; this means that you may or may not qualify for discounts, depending on your location. To find out if you’re eligible for any, contact a Farmers agent in your area.
Companies also needed to offer full-timer coverage for those who live year-round in their RV; full replacement coverage in the event the RV is totaled or stolen; personal belonging coverage for the property inside the RV, including electronics, appliances, and jewelry; vacation liability coverage for injuries that occur at the vacation site where the RV is parked; and permanently attached items coverage for items like satellite dishes, wheelchair lifts, or retractable canopies. Finally, companies also were required to cover most, if not all types of recreational vehicles.
×