Admittedly, we originally approached this topic with the traditional opinion that RVs were mainly of interest to retirees, the baby boomers who enjoy spending their post-work life experiencing the great outdoors. While this segment of the population has long been the backbone of the RV industry, the new trend of working remotely while traveling is attracting much younger consumers to the RV lifestyle.
National General’s mechanical breakdown service provides coverage for up to one hour of labor at the site of a breakdown. Vehicles will be towed to the nearest RV repair facility without dollar or mileage limits. Additionally, once their RV has been repaired after a claim, the company re-inspects it upon request in order to ensure it is in top condition.
Most car insurance providers will offer to include your RV as part of your auto insurance policy, as such you will get traditional car insurance coverage. This will include bodily injury and property damage liability coverage, personal injury protection, collision, comprehensive, medical payments, and uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage, which essentially protects you against accidents and physical damage while on the road. (For a more detailed explanation of coverage see below.)  
So now that we understand the difference between auto and RV coverage, let’s take a look at the specifics of what you get under an RV policy. Essentially, RV insurance acts as a hybrid between car and home insurance, offering additional protection for home and living essentials through specialized coverage plans. Depending on the policy you choose, it may include:
Regardless of how often you use your RV, Safeco is worth a look. Safeco offers coverage for anyone who lives in an RV fewer than 250 days (about eight months). While this won’t cover policyholders who live in their RV full-time, it serves as a nice middle-ground for people who only plan to store their RV away during the winter months, for instance.
An insurance provider and you might not consider your RV to be worth the same. By settling on an agreed value with your potential RV insurance provider, you are ensuring that both you and your insurance company have the same value of your RV in mind if you face a worst-case scenario—the total loss of your RV. It’s also important to ask about the next lower threshold for an agreed value premium. By agreeing to a slightly lower level of coverage, you might be able to save plenty on your premiums.
Collision coverage is limited to the actual cash value of the vehicle, and requires a deductible, which is the amount you'll need to pay before receiving benefits. Higher deductibles lower your premium but increase the amount you must pay out of your own pocket if a loss occurs. Ask yourself how much you would be willing to pay on short notice in order to save on your premium, or talk to your agent.
National General Insurance has been around for a long time—for over 95 years, in fact. It is the only auto insurance company to have originated within the auto manufacturing industry. With nearly a century of experience insuring vehicles, and more than 25 years insuring RVs, Baby Boomers are more likely to appreciate the level of expertise and reliability that National General brings to the table.
Admittedly, we originally approached this topic with the traditional opinion that RVs were mainly of interest to retirees, the baby boomers who enjoy spending their post-work life experiencing the great outdoors. While this segment of the population has long been the backbone of the RV industry, the new trend of working remotely while traveling is attracting much younger consumers to the RV lifestyle.
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