So now that we understand the difference between auto and RV coverage, let’s take a look at the specifics of what you get under an RV policy. Essentially, RV insurance acts as a hybrid between car and home insurance, offering additional protection for home and living essentials through specialized coverage plans. Depending on the policy you choose, it may include:
Whether you are a Millennial or a Baby Boomer, if you have never traversed the tricky field of buying insurance for an RV, your best option is most likely going to be a reliable marketplace that can both inform and point users in the right direction. RVInsurance.com is just that kind of marketplace, featuring a wealth of helpful information pertaining to purchasing an RV, insuring it, and staying safe on the road.
Farmers has a well-rated mobile app, with 4.8 stars and over 2,000 ratings in the Apple App Store. Users praise its convenience and intuitive design. Your insurance information is easily accessible, and Farmers’ mobile app gives you the contact information for your agent, so you can get human help quickly (even if you’re offline). And if you’d like to eschew phone conversations, Farmers allows you to file a claim through the app itself.
Auto insurance premiums depend on the insured party's driving record. A record free of accidents or serious traffic violations typically results in a lower premium. Drivers with histories of accidents or serious traffic violations may pay higher premiums. Likewise, because mature drivers tend to have fewer accidents than less-experienced drivers, insurers typically charge more for drivers below age 25.
Once you know the approximate value of your car and the cost to carry collision coverage, then you can make an informed decision about purchasing that coverage. Many people find that it's a good idea to cover newer cars, but as cars get older, their values decrease, and you might consider omitting or dropping this coverage to save money on your auto insurance.
If you’ve recently purchased a new vehicle, you know that in order to drive in most states, you need to purchase a basic type of car insurance, but you may be overwhelmed by your coverage options. Comprehensive and collision are the two types of physical damage coverage available on car insurance policies. Both play an important role in keeping your vehicle in tip-top shape. Minor dents and dings all the way up to full-blown car crunching can be repaired, or the insurance company can at least pay out enough money to make you whole again.

The minimum liability requirements vary from state to state, with most requiring only $50,000 in bodily injury coverage and $25,000 in property damage. However, to make sure you’re fully covered in case of an accident, we recommend policies that provide much more than the minimum. With this in mind, providers that featured a greater selection of coverage options with higher liability limits across the board ranked higher with us.
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