RV Insurance companies take these type of risk factors into account, which makes it more difficult for bus-conversion homeowners to find the best coverage. Also, buses first need to be registered as RVs with the department of motor vehicles beforehand. If not, they’re still considered commercial vehicles instead of personal, and will not qualify for RV insurance. Different states have different requirements as to what qualifies as an RV, many of which include repainting the bus a different color, having a potable water supply, installing a toilet, and having cooking appliances onboard.

Still, regardless of whether your state requires you to have an RV insurance policy, it’s always best to have one if you plan on living in your RV full-time to protect yourself and your vehicle against any damages and covered losses. On the other hand, if you plan on using your RV seasonally or for short trips, then liability coverage might be enough.
Copyright ©2011, D.R. Horton Insurance Agency, Inc. All Rights Reserved. These materials may not be copied for commercial use or distribution and may not be framed or posted on other sites. Coverage and credits may not be available at all locations or to all customers. This is to give notice that D.R. HORTON, INC., and its subsidiaries have a business relationship with D.R. HORTON INSURANCE AGENCY. The nature of this business relationship is that D.R HORTON INSURANCE AGENCY is directly or indirectly owned by the parent corporation D.R. HORTON, INC. Because of this relationship D.R. HORTON, INC. may receive financial or other benefit from your business. D.R. Horton Insurance Agency is a wholly owned subsidiary and affiliate of D.R. Horton, Inc. This site is governed by the Terms and Conditions & Privacy Policy of D.R. Horton, Inc. D.R. Horton Insurance Agency is licensed and will quote only in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin. Any information provided is only applicable to residents in those states. This web site and its contents are not to be considered a solicitation of insurance in any state other than those states in which the agency is licensed.
The minimum liability requirements vary from state to state, with most requiring only $50,000 in bodily injury coverage and $25,000 in property damage. However, to make sure you’re fully covered in case of an accident, we recommend policies that provide much more than the minimum. With this in mind, providers that featured a greater selection of coverage options with higher liability limits across the board ranked higher with us.
×